Book Announcement: The Exploitation of Raw Materials in Prehistory: Sourcing, Processing and Distribution

The Exploitation of Raw Materials in Prehistory: Sourcing, Processing and Distribution now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

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Hardback, pp656, £80.99 / $138.95

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Exploitation of Raw Materials in Prehistory: Sourcing, Processing and Distribution, edited by Telmo Pereira, Xavier Terradas and Nuno Bicho.

This collection presents state-of-the-art approaches to the use of inorganic raw materials in the period known as prehistory. It focuses on stone-tools, adornments, colorants and pottery from Europe, America and Africa. The chapters intimately merge archaeology, anthropology, geology, geography, physics and chemistry to reconstruct past human behaviour, economy, technology, ecology, cognition, territory and social complexity. The book represents a framework of raw material investigation for those working in science, regardless of the time period, region of the world or materials they are studying.

To read a full summary of the book and to read a 30-page sample extract, which includes the table of contents, please visit the following link:

http://www.cambridgescholars.com/the-exploitation-of-raw-materials-in-prehistory


All Cambridge Scholars authors and contributors are entitled to a 40% discount on this title, to claim this simply enter the author discount code on the My Order page after adding the book to your basket from the link above. For further information about the author discount, please contact admin@cambridgescholars.com.


The Exploitation of Raw Materials in Prehistory: Sourcing, Processing and Distribution can be purchased directly from Cambridge Scholars, through Amazon and other online retailers, or through our global network of distributors. Our partners include Bertram, Gardners, Baker & Taylor, Ingram, YBP, Inspirees and MHM Limited. An e-book version will be available for purchase through the Google Play store in due course.

For further information on placing an order for this title, please contact orders@cambridgescholars.com.

About the Editors

Telmo Pereira is a Researcher at the Interdisciplinary Center for Archaeology and Evolution of Human Behaviour (ICArEHB) at the University of Algarve, Portugal, where he received his PhD in 2010. He has been working with stone-tools from the Lower Paleolithic to the Bronze Age, in Portugal, and with Middle Stone Age stone tools from South Africa. His work in the last few years has been dedicated to raw material sourcing and processing distribution in prehistory, focusing in particular on their provenance and characterization.

Xavier Terradas is a Research Scientist at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), based in the IMF Institute (Archaeology of Social Dynamics Group), Barcelona, Spain. He has mainly worked on the study of socioeconomic strategies in the Mesolithic-Neolithic transition as well as its dynamics of change in the Western Mediterranean. He specializes in studying technological innovations and technical skills in prehistory, especially those related to stone tools production. In recent years, his research has focused on raw material availability and quarrying activities.

Nuno Bicho, PhD, is Associate Professor of Archaeology at the University of Algarve, Portugal, where he is also the Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Archaeology and Evolution of Human Behaviour (ICArEHB). Further to this, he is the Academic Editor of the journal, PLOS ONE. He specializes in Paleolithic ecodynamics and researches the Mesolithic of the Tagus Valley and on the Middle Stone Age in Mozambique.

 

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