Book Announcement: The Effect of the 1958 New York Convention on Foreign Arbitral Awards in the Arab Gulf States

The Effect of the 1958 New York Convention on Foreign Arbitral Awards in the Arab Gulf States now available from Cambridge Scholars Publishing

9781443895774
Hardback, pp255, £

Cambridge Scholars Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of The Effect of the 1958 New York Convention on Foreign Arbitral Awards in the Arab Gulf States by Reyadh Mohamed Seyadi.

In the second half of the twentieth century, alongside the evolution of the global economy, modern technology, rapid transportation and multinational enterprises, there was an increased demand for a dispute resolution mechanism that met the needs of traders, international trade and economic policy-makers. Arbitration as an alternative dispute resolution has significantly gained in popularity in the Arab Gulf States over the past two decades or so. This is no doubt reason enough to take a closer look at the main theme that defines arbitration in this region. National courts of the Arab Gulf states are invariably seen as not very arbitration friendly, some possibly even hostile to arbitration. Public order, alongside the Islamic legal traditions, is seen as unruly horse that could possibly undermine the development of international commercial arbitration in this region. The contribution in this book will go some way toward dissipating the concerns that are routinely raised about the procedural and practical soundness of arbitration in the Arab Gulf states. In addition, the book serves to place arbitration in the Arab Gulf states in its present legal systems, national laws and courts practices.

To read a full summary of the book and to read a 30-page sample extract, which includes the table of contents, please visit the following link:

http://www.cambridgescholars.com/the-effect-of-the-1958-new-york-convention-on-foreign-arbitral-awards-in-the-arab-gulf-states


All Cambridge Scholars authors and contributors are entitled to a 40% discount on this title, to claim this simply enter the author discount code on the My Order page after adding the book to your basket from the link above. For further information about the author discount, please contact admin@cambridgescholars.com.


The Effect of the 1958 New York Convention on Foreign Arbitral Awards in the Arab Gulf States can be purchased directly from Cambridge Scholars, through Amazon and other online retailers, or through our global network of distributors. Our partners include Bertram, Gardners, Baker & Taylor, Ingram, YBP, Inspirees and MHM Limited. An e-book version will be available for purchase through the Google Play store in due course.

For further information on placing an order for this title, please contact orders@cambridgescholars.com.

About the Author

Reyadh Mohamed Seyadi is currently Assistant Professor of Commercial Law at the University of Bahrain. He holds a PhD in International Commercial Law from the University of Sheffield, UK, and an LLM in International Commercial and Business Law from the University of East Anglia, UK. He has been appointed as a member of the International Council for Commercial Arbitration (ICCA) and as an associate member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb). His area of expertise and his main research interests focus on international commercial arbitration, investment arbitration, the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL), and Islamic finance. He has recently published number of journal articles on legal aspects of Islamic finance and international commercial arbitration.

 

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