International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples – Cambridge Scholars Publishing

On the 9th of August, Cambridge Scholars Publishing will be marking this years’ International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. There are more than 370 million indigenous people in the world, and they comprise an overwhelming majority of the world’s estimated 7,000 languages and 5,000 cultures.

Yet the historical pressures of capitalism, colonialism, and globalisation have weighted heavily on the lives and futures of the world’s indigenous communities. These pressures have led to a surge in critical scholarship examining and critiquing the West’s relationship with indigenous peoples, and more recently scholars working from interdisciplinary post-, anti-, and de-colonial perspectives have attempted to highlight the importance of indigenous philosophies, ideas, and worldviews. At Cambridge Scholars, we are proud to contribute to this project not only by publishing the best scholarly work focusing on indigenous peoples and their lives, but by working with indigenous authors to emphasise their voices.

To mark this upcoming day, we are offering our readers a 50% discount on four of our most important titles that speak to this theme. To redeem your discount, please enter the promotional code INDIGENOUS18 during checkout. Please note that this is a time-limited offer that will expire on 1st September 2018.


 

0460680_and-therell-be-no-dancing_300Just prior to the federal election of 2007, the Australian government led by John Howard decreed the “Northern Territory National Emergency Response”, commonly known as the Intervention, officially in reaction to an investigation by the Northern Territory government into allegedly rampant sexual abuse and neglect of Indigenous children. Far from improving the living conditions of Indigenous Australians and children, the policies have resulted in disempowerment, widespread despair, criminalisation and higher unemployment. Fourteen essays by scholars from Australia and Germany examine (historical) contexts and discourses of the Intervention and subsequent policies impacting Indigenous Australia since 2007 from the perspective of diverse academic disciplines. They invite readers to engage in the debate about human rights, about Indigenous self-determination, and about the preservation of Indigenous culture.

0641746_community-practices-in-india_300As the seat of the origin of social work profession, the global North has dominated the production of social work knowledge while the global South has remained primarily the consumer of knowledge. This book is a ground-breaking collaboration by practitioners and academics from India to bring together indigenous knowledge in community organizing from the rich and vast base of experience existing within the country. It also presents an unprecedented example of the contribution made by the College of Social Work, Nirmala Niketan, Mumbai, in addressing societal injustice and leaves the reader with thought-provoking questions around the scope and role of academic institutions towards this end. This volume will engage social work students, practitioners and educators in a critical reflection on the key concepts, processes, strategies and tensions underlying community organizing practices within the Indian context.

0595277_decolonising-the-university_300At each particular historical moment, the university appears as a heavy and rigid structure resisting changes, whereas, throughout time, it has actually undergone profound transformation. Often such changes have been drastic and almost always provoked by factors external to the university, be they of a religious, political or economic nature. This book explores the nature and dynamics of the transformation that the university is undergoing today. It argues that some of the projects of reform currently under way are so radical that the question of the future of the university may well turn into the question of whether the university has a future. A specific feature of this inquiry is the realisation that questioning the future of the university involves questioning its past as well.

0707464_the-arts-and-indigenous-knowledge-systems-in-a-modernized-africa_300This collection derives from a conference held in Pretoria, South Africa, and discusses issues of indigenous knowledge systems (IKS) and the arts. It presents ideas about how to promote a deeper understanding of IKS within the arts, the development of IKS-arts research methodologies, and the protection and promotion of IKS in the arts. Knowledge, embedded in song, dance, folklore, design, architecture, theatre, and attire, and the visual arts can promote innovation and entrepreneurship, and it can improve communication. IKS, however, exists in a post-millennium, modernizing Africa. The book captures leading trends and ideas that could help to protect, promote, develop and affirm indigenous knowledge and systems, whilst also making room for ideas that do not necessarily oppose IKS, but encourage the modernization (not Westernization) of Africa.


To find out more about the International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples, please click here.

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